Church Blog

Good afternoon everyone! What Happens When Christians Fail To Make Jesus Look Good? “Do you know one of the top reasons people don’t want to follow Christ?” My mentor put down her coffee mug and extended her pointer finger in my direction. She then answered her own question, “Christians!” she exclaimed. “We are all hungry beggars inviting other hungry beggars to accompany us to the dump,” she concluded. “Don’t forget that.” Christians fail to make Jesus look good If people only looked to Christians in order to discover who Jesus is, no one would want to choose Him! When we look at both the world and the church, both inside and out, it can sometimes be difficult to tell the difference. When Christians fail to make Jesus look good, it’s no wonder many turn away from following Jesus. Christians are to be the true Church. Christians are described in the most intimate of terms as a Bride of Christ (Revelation 19:7). Christ-followers don’t reluctantly trudge behind Jesus. They are to live, learn, and long to become like Him as we seek His kingdom come. Despite knowing what the ideal standard is for Christians, we still are guilty of constantly misrepresenting Jesus. Sinful and broken, every careless person can be the culprit to leading others away from Jesus. Own the wrong and the responsibility We won’t ever perfectly represent Jesus. We’re as desperate for God’s help in our righteousness, as we are in our salvation. But we can live authentically by the power of the Holy Spirit. We can unashamedly confess our sin, and we can respond with humility when we do wrong or are wronged by others. Time after time Gods word tells us to watch our tongue, to count others above ourselves, and to love sacrificially. God uses His people to redeem the views of those who’ve been hurt, judged, and disregarded by those in the Church. So how do we address those who have suffered in the Church? Remember the importance of grace Jesus came to Earth, in order to die to take the punishment we deserve and present us Holy to God. However we are still a broken humanity. It’s through our mistakes, such as unbridled tongues and deep-seated pride that can bring proof that we all need Jesus to take away our sins. Explain that we don’t have to have our act together before receiving salvation. It is by grace we are saved through faith (Ephesians 2:8-9). God’s grace is an extravagant gift that spurs Christians to want to live a life worthy of this gift. After all our works do not earn our faith, they validate it (James 2:17). Ask Challenge your friends to investigate Christ, not Christians. Christians are a family, a group of needy people on their way to meet their Savior. Our sisters and brothers in Christ will hurt many of us; just like we are hurt daily by those we love. Apologize and recognize the hurt by declaring how sorry you are for what they have experienced. Clarify that his or her hurt came from someone who was acting in a manner that is not true to Jesus himself. We must constantly keep in mind that Christians are not perfectly righteous (Romans 3:10). Depending on the situation and the wrong done to them, perhaps a helpful conversation with God’s love speaking through you should considered. And follow through!

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Jan 19th at 12:54pm


Don'f forget to come and join us for our Sunday Morning Service that starts at 10:30 a.m. You won't want to miss as Pastor Jewett continues his new series "You've Got Mail: A Letter From Jesus" out of Revelation 2-3.

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Jan 13th at 8:00pm


If You’ve Ever Felt Betrayed: Jesus Understands “While they were reclining at the table eating, he said, "Truly I tell you, one of you will betray me--one who is eating with me." Mark 14:18 Betrayal. Chances are, if we’ve lived long enough, we know very well what this feels like. To be betrayed or wronged by one who was trusted is a difficult hurdle to get over. It can sometimes leave us stuck right where it happened, we spin it over in our minds a million different ways, asking all the why's, but there's usually no adequate answer to even satisfy. He knows. He understands. Judas Iscariot, one who walked with Jesus and knew him well, paid simple money to betray our Savior. 30 pieces of silver, given in exchange for His life. It seems almost incredible that he would fall for such a trap or be so wrapped in greed. Money can't be placed on any life. But on the very One who did so much for him, who offered such love and forgiveness? The ultimate betrayal of a friend. Yet Jesus knew it was part of a larger plan. And He still chose to say “yes” and walk that difficult road. Because He understood at the very core of it all, was our need to be set free. Our need for forgiveness. The crowd, who had just days before been praising His name as He rode into Jerusalem, suddenly changed. The tide had turned, things had shifted in the other direction. Jesus, once loved and followed by the multitudes, became the person the crowds turned hatred and insults upon. His own disciples scattered, out of fear for their own lives. They ran. Away from him. In the darkest hours. Peter, one of his bravest, closest friends, even denied knowing him, 3 different times. The deep hurt Jesus must have endured, the pain, the loneliness, is hard to imagine. So often in this life when we are wronged, betrayed, offended, or treated unfairly, we want to rise up. To defend our rights and on our own point of view. Or we fight hard to get even. Or even stew in silence while nursing our wounds and getting more angry. It’s hard to extend the same grace and compassion that Christ Himself extended to others in the midst of his own pain. Yet He set the example, the way for us to walk. He knew the trap of betrayal and unforgiveness, he saw through its lies, the deep wounds of the soul that it could cause. He chose the better way, stepped over its grasp, and chose to love, to forgive. Unforgiveness, even towards ourselves, will keep us prisoner to the past, to the wrong, to the betrayal, to the offender. It will never allow us to move forward in the freedom of where God wants us to live. And even hidden resentments, the ones we think no one sees, or knows about, safely tucked away into a secret place in our souls, will weigh us down, trapping us in the very place we wish to let go of. But we don't have to live there. We can make the choice to move forward. Though forgiveness may never "feel" right, it will always "be" right. Because in it you will be set free. Choosing to forgive doesn't mean that the wrong never happened, it just means you refuse to allow it to control your life anymore. Christ forgave. Huge love covering all the wrong, all the sin, all the barriers that block our way to God. He whispered these words up to His Father, grace words, breathing out love, through the suffering and the pain. He spoke them out loud. For those that persecuted Him. For us. For the world. “Father, forgive them…” And He forgives. Still. Grace. Amazing love. That covers a multitude of sin. Let go. Give it to Him. He carried all the hurt for you. He understands your pain. In Him, we are set free. By Debbie McDaniel

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Jan 9th at 8:12pm


We look forward to you joining us at 10:30 am for morning service. Pastor Ryan will be preaching. If you are not able to make it today, remember to watch the Live Stream through www.jasperbiblechurch.org Happy Christmas Eve! There will be no evening service.

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Dec 24th 2017


Good afternoon! JBC is look forward to seeing you all this evening for our Group Bible Studies for all ages. If you are unsure what what time your group starts or maybe you will be joining us for the first time on Wednesday night, please, click on the events tab for more detailed information. Please, join us!

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Dec 13th 2017


Good morning everyone! We except to be mistreated in the world, but we’re often blindsided—and get our feelings hurt—when brothers and sisters in Christ talk behind our backs or aren’t there for us in a time of need. Have you been hurt in church? What are you supposed to do? How do you handle it? Leave the church? Confront the issue? Bury it? Lash out at the person who hurt you? When people are hurt by a church or church member, how can this conflict be resolved? What does the Bible say about this and how do you practically work that out? When a pastor or a parishioner hurts you, the very first action to take is prayer. The hurt you feel is real and pretending like you aren’t hurt isn’t going to bring healing. Sometimes when we get hurt in church folks like to tell us that we have no reason to feel bad and we just need to get over it. Half of that statement is true. We do need to get over it, but it’s not always true that we have no reason to feel bad. If someone is spewing malicious gossip behind your back and you find out about it, it stings. No matter what kind of hurt you’re dealing with, don’t rush into a confrontation with the offender. Take it to God in prayer. Psalm 50:15 says, “Call upon me in the day of trouble.” That works for a troubled soul just as well as it does any other trouble. Tell Him how you feel and ask Him to heal your wounds. It may be that the Lord is going to deal with the offender directly and anything you say would just make matters worse. Or, it could be that the Lord will give you a graceful way to explain why you feel hurt. If you take it to God, He can give you the very words to say to your offender (Luke 12:12). And He can bring conviction to that person’s heart when you approach them with a spirit of humility (John 16:8). Whatever you do, don’t retaliate. In His Sermon on the Mount, Jesus teaches us to turn the other cheek (Matt. 5:38) and to love our enemies, bless those who curse you, do good to those who hate you, and pray for those who spitefully use you and persecute you (Matt. 5:44). With that in mind, don’t go around telling everybody what someone did to hurt your feelings. And don’t make accusations against those who hurt you if you decide to confront the matter. Instead of saying, “You hurt my feelings!” say, “When you did that I felt hurt” or “When you talk to me like that I feel upset.” Own your feelings because they are your feelings. It’s very possible that your offender has no idea that what they said or did hurt you—and never meant to hurt you. If you approach them in humility seeking reconciliation, your offender may be quick to apologize. Peter exhorts us to “above all things, have fervent love for one another, for love will cover a multitude of sins” (1 Pet. 4:8). Again, be led by the Holy Spirit. It’s not always necessary to go to someone who hurt you every time they do something you don’t like. It could be that the Lord is working something out in you. Maybe you’re too sensitive. We always need to check our hearts. Is the person really being hurtful or are we looking at it through filters of past hurts or rejection or anger that cloud the truth? Ask the Lord. Or it could be that the Holy Spirit will bring conviction—maybe even heap coals of fire on their head—as you bless them outwardly with a heart of love. The bottom line is this: It doesn’t matter how wrong your offender is, you have to forgive. Forgiveness is not for the other person—it’s for you. Forgiveness doesn’t justify what someone did that was wrong. If you don’t forgive, you end up bitter and resentful and before too long you’ll end up hurting other people. The healing process can’t really begin until you spit out the bait of offense. I’ll leave you with this prophetic insight the Holy Spirit gave me once when I was extremely hurt in church: “When the feeling of hurt arises, the spirit of offense comes on the scene to fortify the pain, tempting you to hold on to the grudge in your heart. Therefore, the proper response to emotional pain of the soul is always an immediate confession of forgiveness from the heart. The alternative to forgiveness from the heart is the ongoing torment of the soul. So if you want to be free from your hurts and wounds, take thoughts of forgiveness, meditate on them and confess them rather than taking thoughts of the hurt, meditating on them and confessing them. This is God’s way—and it’s the only way that brings true healing. And, while you are at it, pray for those who have hurt you. This process will cleanse your heart and renew your mind. And you will walk free from the pain of your past.”

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Dec 11th 2017


Good morning everyone! Romans 1:8-12. Paul says to the church: First, I thank my God through Jesus Christ for all of you, because your faith is proclaimed in all the world. For God is my witness, whom I serve with my spirit in the gospel of his Son, that without ceasing I mention you always in my prayers, asking that somehow by God's will I may now at last succeed in coming to you. For I long to see you, that I may impart to you some spiritual gift to strengthen you—that is, that we may be mutually encouraged by each other's faith, both yours and mine. I would like to discuss our responsibility to minister to our pastor. We have heard many times that all Christians are ministers, according to Ephesians 4:12. We stress in our Sunday school classes the need to pray for each other and encourage each other in the faith, but I think we are prone to forget that our pastor is one of us. So I want to remind us why we need to minister to our pastor, how we might do it better, and what we can hope for as a result. First, why must we minister to our pastor? The reason is that he is a human and a fellow believer like us. As a man, he is just as susceptible to temptations as any of us. Faith isn't automatic for him just because he is a pastor. It is no easier for him to be a loving, hopeful person than it is for us. His resources in the fight of faith are no greater than ours. He is one of us. More than that, the unique burdens of his calling demand our faithful ministry to him; for example, the administrative burden of see­ing that a hundred details are taken care of. Most of these we are never even aware of. Then there is the burden of hearing and delivering messages from God week after week. Don't ever think that these messages come easily for a pastor. If they are con­sistently Biblical, they require much hard work. Many tears are shed in a pastor's study over sermons that just won't come. If we feel spiritually dry we might skip church or come for renewal, but where can a pastor go? Then there is the burden of wanting his peo­ple to act more like Jesus and be the light of the world. Paul said to the Galatians (4:19), "I am again in the anguish of childbirth until Christ is formed in you!" Nothing weighs heavier on a pastor's heart than when his people don’t grow in faith, love, and righteousness. You could all make a longer list of pastoral pressures, but now let's consider how we can minister to our pastor. The best way to bear the burden of your pastor is to be a Christian. Paul said in Philip­pians 2:2-3, "Complete my joy by being of the same mind, having the same love, being in full accord and of one mind. Do nothing from rivalry or conceit, but in humility count others more significant than yourselves." In other words, nothing will refresh our pastor like a humble, loving, Christ-like congregation. Paul said to the Roman church, "I long to see you … that we may be mutually encouraged by each other's faith" (1:11-12). Our faith is a source of great encouragement to our pastor. So let's be a believing people. Besides this, I have three specific suggestions of things we can do to build our pastor up and increase the fruitfulness of his ministry. 1) Pray for him every day. Write it down so you don't forget. And don't just say, "God bless the pastor.” Be specific. Pray for his health, his messages, his family, his visiting, his flaws and weaknesses. Put yourself in his place and try to feel with him as you pray. 2) Second, go out of your way to say some gracious words of encouragement. Write him a note on the registration card, send a letter now and then to his home; call him up on the phone. Get him alone sometime, look him right in the face, and say, "I appreciate your work, pastor, and I am praying for you every day." Don't be satisfied with platitudes at the door after Sunday services. 3) Third, admonish him in a spirit of forgiveness. I have never talked to anyone in my life who is completely satisfied with his pastor. There is a very simple reason: All men are imperfect. Some people never seem to learn this and they hop from church to church in search of the flawless pastor. That's hopeless. It is far better to find a church where you feel at home and to consider it your life­long responsibility to help the pastor grow. Everyone would like to change something about his pastor, but how many of us have devoted ourselves to earnest prayer about that thing? And how many have sat down with him and with a humble, forgiving spirit admonished him to change? If we love him we will do it ... and he is not all that scary to talk to. Those are just some of the ways to minister to your pastor. You think of others. The final question I raised was, what can we hope for as a result of our ministry? In short, we can hope for a refreshed, hopeful, invigorated pastor. Thus our ministry to him will come back to us like a boomerang and will create a refreshed, hopeful, and invigorated people. Then the world will know that Christ is real and is at work among us.

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Nov 27th 2017


Don't forget -- the Chili Cookoff today at noon! Come out for some fun, fellowship, and football!

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Nov 18th 2017


Good morning everyone! “If your first concern is to look after yourself, you’ll never find yourself. But if you forget about yourself and look to me, you’ll find both yourself and me.” (Matthew 10:39 MSG) Jesus was a man who was purpose driven. He knew his purpose, and he lived with priorities. The earliest statement we have from Jesus was when he was 12 years old and said, “I must be about my Father’s business.” At age 12, he already knew his life plan. He was focused. Then, at the end of his life, he said, “It is finished.” Those are the bookends of a successful life. I want you to live a successful life. I want you to get to the end of your life and say, “I did it. I used my life the way God wanted me. I may have had a rocky start. But I used the rest of my life the way God wanted me to use it. And I put him first.” Jesus said in Luke 12:30, “Only people who don’t know God are always worrying” (CEV). What does that mean? It means that when you worry, you’re acting like an atheist. Worry is practical atheism. It’s saying you don’t really believe God’s going to take care of you. It’s acting like an orphan. Jesus also said in verse 31, “Your Father knows what you need. But put God’s work first, and these things will be yours as well.” All the other things in your life — your career, your education, your friendships, your romance, your finances — are all from God and are good. But if you’re a Christian, God comes first in your life. Everything else is second place. When you put him first, everything else will come into focus. God will help you with that. Have you ever talked to people who say, “I'm just trying to find myself”? I hate to tell them, but they’re never going to find themselves — unless they do what Matthew 10:39 says: “If your first concern is to look after yourself, you’ll never find yourself. But if you forget about yourself and look to me, you’ll find both yourself and me” (MSG). The most counter-culture statement in today’s world is the first sentence of “The Purpose Driven Life”: “It’s not about you.” Everything in society says it’s all about you. All of the advertisements say it’s all about you: “Have it your way,” “We do it all for you,” “You deserve a break today,” “Obey your thirst,” “You’re worth it.” Yet God says the only way you’re ever going to find yourself is by forgetting yourself and focusing on God. Then you’ll not only figure out God; you’ll also figure out you. That’s what it means to live like Jesus.

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Nov 14th 2017


Good morning everyone! We recently had two family pets in our household. Molly who is our beloved and faithful German Shepherd, and has the affectionate soul of a saint and a cat who we had renamed Snipes because of the condition of his heart. He was known by all who knew him as a predator and hot shot backbiter! For reasons known only to him, he would wait until you were just about to reach out and pet him and he would pounce on you with an evil vengeance unlike anything you have ever seen. Our precious Molly had to endure bites and attacks every day from that cat. For without warning, and unprovoked, he would simply jump on them for no reason to try and bite him. Like all seasoned backbiters, Snipes was very calm and collected. He was so sweet to look at. Yet the closer you got to him and the more you engaged him, the more pain he would inflict upon you. If Snipes could talk today, I feel sure that he would tell you that he regrets being that way. His mean and backbiting nature cost him his life over the long haul. While we mostly ignored him, because we got tired of the attacks in trying to befriend him, our neighborhood cats were not so tolerant and willing to ignore him. He was constantly fighting other cats and because of that, he ended up with Feline Leukemia and has just recently died. Like Snipes there are some people with that same backbiting nature. Whenever you see them coming you just try and dodge them. Because you know what they are capable of once they open their mouths. While they may be enjoying whatever pleasure they receive by pouncing on other’s feelings and lives, with their slanderous backbiting, malice and gossip, in the end they will end up being bitten themselves by the whirlwind of wrong, vindictive and mean choices that they have inflicted on others. When someone backbites or gossips, others may listen, but they will never trust the one who is dishing out the information that could, in the long run, cause great pain in someone else’s life. When that person hurts others by gossip or innuendo, they are saying much more about their own character than the one who they are hurting. They never consider the impact it may have in turning the opinions of the one that they are sharing it with, to dislike or disrespect the one being talked about. James 4:12 says, “…what right do you have to condemn your neighbor?” In all honesty, I have never met a person that has not engaged in some type of gossip or backbiting at some point in their lives, including myself. Yet, for the most part, we that do not call ourselves gossips or backbiters, have often times said something... and in hindsight wished we would have never opened our mouths. We may call what we say or do, “well meaning” gossip. Yet the Bible tells us that ….those who "refuse" to slander others or harm their neighbors, or speak evil of their friends….such people will stand firm forever.” Ps 15:1-5. This should be what we strive for. The Bible actually has a lot to say about gossip, slander, malice and backbiting, and the lessons that we can learn from scripture and start applying even today, is to stop it! Simply realize your responsibility, confess it and change your attitude about it. Realize that we all reap what we sow….and as God’s children we had better be about sowing kindness and compassion. Like we had to do with Snipes, you may in love just need to avoid those people that get you caught up in their gossip, making sure that you yourselves are not the ones instigating the pain on others through your own desire to spread the news that you deem so important, that it just needs to be shared! Be aware, be very aware....it will always come back and the bite is very bitter! Leviticus 19:16 – Do not go about spreading slander among your people. Do not do anything that endangers your neighbor’s life. I am the Lord. 1 Timothy 5:13 – Besides, they get into the habit of being idle and going about from house to house. And not only do they become idlers, but also gossips and busybodies, saying things they ought not to. Proverbs 18:8 – The words of gossip are like choice morsels; they go down to a man’s inmost parts.

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Nov 8th 2017